The CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance can be downloaded here in   summary   or   full

The CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance can be downloaded here in summary or full

CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance

The current movement toward open data and open science does not fully engage with Indigenous Peoples rights and interests. Existing principles within the open data movement (e.g. FAIR: findable, accessible, interoperable, reusable) primarily focus on characteristics of data that will facilitate increased data sharing among entities while ignoring power differentials and historical contexts. The emphasis on greater data sharing alone creates a tension for Indigenous Peoples who are also asserting greater control over the application and use of Indigenous data and Indigenous Knowledge for collective benefit.

This includes the right to create value from Indigenous data in ways that are grounded in Indigenous worldviews and realise opportunities within the knowledge economy. The CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance are people and purpose-oriented, reflecting the crucial role of data in advancing Indigenous innovation and self-determination. These principles complement the existing FAIR principles encouraging open and other data movements to consider both people and purpose in their advocacy and pursuits.


#BeFAIRandCARE

FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship can be   accessed here

FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship can be accessed here


Acknowledgements

The CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance were drafted at the International Data Week and Research Data Alliance Plenary co-hosted event “Indigenous Data Sovereignty Principles for the Governance of Indigenous Data Workshop,” 8 November 2018, Gaborone, Botswana.

  • Co-lead: Stephanie Russo Carroll, University of Arizona, USA

  • Co-lead: Maui Hudson, University of Waikato, Aotearoa New Zealand

  • Jan Chapman, Australian National University, Australia

  • Oscar Luis Figueroa-Rodríguez, COLPOS-Colegio de Postgraduados, Mexico

  • Jarita Holbrook, University of Western Cape, South Africa

  • Ray Lovett, Australian National University, Australia

  • Simeon Materechera, North West University, South Africa

  • Mark Parsons, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA

  • Kay Raseroka, Joint Minds Consult, Botswana

  • Desi Rodriguez-Lonebear, University of Arizona, USA & University of Waikato, Aotearoa New Zealand

  • Robyn Rowe, Laurentian University, Canada

  • Rodrigo Sara, Consultative Group on International Agriculture Research(CGIAR)/Biodiversity International, Italy

  • Jennifer Walker, Laurentian University, Canada

Thank you to the following individuals for their comments, edits, and suggestions: Randy Akee, Leah Ballantyne, Donna Cormack, Dominique David-Chavez, Bhiamie Eckford-Williamson, Nanibaa’ Garrison, Sharon Hausam, Lydia Jennings, Tahu Kukutai, Kelsey Leonard, Christina Ore, Qunmigu (Kacey Hopson), Andrew Sporle, Michele Suina, Maggie Walter, the Alaska Native Policy Center at the First Alaskans Institute, and the “The International Law, United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and Indigenous Data Sovereignty” Workshop at the Oñati International Institute of the Sociology of Law.